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London churches join in The Conservation Foundation and Mayor's tree planting campaign

18th January 2018

During the recent National Tree Week and Interfaith Week, hundreds of trees were planted across London to help improve the capital's air quality and biodiversity and increase its canopy cover through The Conservation Foundation's Trees for Sacred Spaces campaign, supported by the Mayor of London.

With the help of the London Tree Officers Association, the Foundation chose 12 different species noted for their ability to reduce pollution and attract pollinators including mulberry, yew, cypress, tulip, apple, cherry and strawberry trees which are now growing in a variety of sacred spaces in the Dioceses of London and Southwark. With the help of schools, community groups, congregations and other volunteers, 340 trees were planted at 59 sites, either in churchyards or, where there was no suitable space, in a nearby school or community space nominated by local churches.

The project was supported by the diocesan bishops and launched by The Rt Revd Richard Chartres, shortly before his retirement last February and Shirley Rodrigues, London's Deputy Mayor for Environment and Energy.

David Shreeve, director of The Conservation Foundation, says, "We were very glad to be able to work with the Mayor of London and many of London's churches to undertake this project. Trees for Sacred Spaces helped improve London's air and biodiversity and give Londoners of all ages a chance to do something positive not just by planting trees, but looking after them in years to come."

Find out where the trees have been planted on our online map.

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